Students using iPads Photo courtesy of Brad Flickinger

K-12 education in the United States will have unprecedented access to education technology in the next few years. Signed into law last December, the Every Child Succeeds Act (ESSA) is making a number of changes to federal education spending policy that provide individual states with more resources for education technology.

Over $1.6 billion in enrichment funds will be made available each fiscal year from 2017 to 2020 for technology that facilitates a number of education initiatives including blended learning, STEM subjects, and professional development.

With education spending policy now managed at the state level, local administrators will have more flexibility on investing in education technology hardware, software, and training. This allows districts and states to tailor their education strategies to best fit the needs of student and educators. Students in remote and underserved areas will benefit by having greater access to high-quality classroom material and resources.

One of the most important responsibilities for local administrators will be in making future-thinking investments that will continue to flourish long after 2020.

Effective investments in educational technology will benefit students, teachers, and guardians. Providing students with more online resources and tailored support will empower them to learn outside the confines of the classroom. Teachers will benefit with greater access to quality professional development and classroom resources. Parents and guardians will be able to engage in two-way communication with teachers and more empowered in participating in the education of their children.

School boards across the United States will greatly benefit from the influx of educational technology and resources. The key will be to invest in the future in order to benefit future generations of students and educators.

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About the Author: Dustin is a senior account manager with DesignedUX, providing communications and strategy to organizations in education and technology. Dustin is also board member of the Canadian Public Relations Society and contributes as a communications researcher with McMaster University.